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with israel's new governing coalition sworn into office today. >> ifill: paul solman reports on older workers in academic institutions, professors in the classroom long past age 65. >> am i keeping track of jobs? yes. that's okay. as long as i'm a good teacher, that's what's important. >> woodruff: and we examine the republican national committee's call for a new direction for the g.o.p., a road map hoping for a rebound in 2016 and beyond. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registrati
arizona and the federal government related to immigration issues. over the summer, the supreme court upheld part of a top state law that allowed police to check for immigration papers. other states, including alabama, georgia, kansas and tennessee, have similar laws on the books and a number of other states are also considering comparable measures. the obama administration supports the challenge to the arizona law. and today's arguments on the heels of another case that could roll back a key portion of the voting rights act of 1965. for more on today's arguments, we turn as always to marcia coyle of the "national law journal." she was in the courtroom this morning, and is back with us tonight. so the outcome, marcia, of this could actually tip the federal-state balance on who gets to govern how we vote. >> that's true, gwen. the question before the justices is where do you draw the line between who has the authority to regulate elections. the election clause of the constitution actually gives authority to both. but where is the line when one crosses or goes too far than the other doe
. cruze says his dad made it on his own without government assistance. he worked hard and provide for his family and now his son has achieved the american dream. that's the way this country is supposed to work. but president obama himself has a very compelling story to tell. his father abandoned him. he was raised primarily by his maternal grandparents in hawaii. he had few resources. yet, barack obama rose up to become the most powerful man in the world, a stunning achievement. how much the system helped mr. obama is unknown as his college records have been kept private. we don't know the extent of affirmative action. we don't know how much the government subsidized his climb to the top. it would be very helpful to have that information simply to be fair to the president and his vision there is no president obama believes his discuss is is due to government that goes to the famous line "you didn't build that." so the battle lines are now drawn between senator cruise who believes in the free market and small government and president obama who wants the government partially regulate the ec
and local government have absolutely been desmated by rising healthcare costs, rising pension benefits they're paying out to retirees. this is the last strom they're paying what is left for snow removal, and they may have to ask for more money. the only silver lininges it forces families to stay home. have that dinner table conversation they might rather not have. they're all stuck in a dark room and can't use electronics. so there's so positives. >> neil: there is that. i'm wondering, this whole first quarter of the year has been buffetted by one storm after another and i'm wondering how it's going to affect the overall economy in terms of gdp and big data we get. will it be slower or is the boom you generally get after something like this make up for it? >> well, again, we still have the head wind from the rise in the payroll tax, which is absolutely affecting consumers. also, gdp will be faked. corporate earnings will be affected be the rising dollar and slow european recovery, if there is a recovery. and when we look at the storms, many in the northeast have fallen othe weekends, the ti
to release thousands more. the government documents show that immigrants released about 1000 illegal immigrants from jails around the u.s. each week in the past two weeks of february. when that happens, there were different reactions. gov. rick perry of texas weighed in on this. this is a story from a local texas paper. it said he joined the chorus of republicans expressing criticism for the decision to release the immigrant detainees. we are asking you this morning, should be illegal immigrants be detained at all? is asking that question. here are the numbers. an average of $122-$164 per day to detain immigrants in federal custody bridget custody. alternatives such as supervised release or electronic monitoring carrying an average price tag of $14 per day. more than 95 percent of immigrants to show up for their final court hearing according to human rights first. let's hear what you have to say this morning. john, raleigh, north carolina, republican. isller: this administration or is trying to score political points. the released 12 bosch -- 12 high-risk level 1 offenders. to thetom
of lehman brothers, the fourth-largest investment bank in the world. >> isn't the government supposed to protect the investors? >> yes. >> aren't they charged with informing investors? >> yes. >> why didn't they do it? >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm bob simon. even though fraud played a significant role in the 2008 meltdown of the american economy, as of late 2012, there have been several civil suits filed against major wall street financial firms, but not a single criminal prosecution. in this edition, we look back at the 2008 financial crisis and the failure of government regulators to prosecute those who might be criminally responsible. later, lehman brothers bankruptcy investigator anton valukas shares his findings on the collapse of the giant investment bank where no senior official has ever faced charges in the biggest bankruptcy in u.s. history. but first we begin with a nine-month 60 minutes investigation looking for wall street cases that might have prosecutorial merit. in december 2011, steve kroft reported on two such cases. we begin with a woman named eileen foster,
the federal government should we in the rowboat and business. there should be a national university and washington. he proposed a national astronomical observatory. a white house of the sky. for this, he was ridiculed by the jeffersonian small government crowd. it did nothing to enhance his popularity at the time. it may have contributed to his defeat for reelection. 100 years later, it looks prophetic. >> hi, jennifer. >> i am enjoying this series, i watch every week. >> thank you. >> my question is, and it may have been shown during the program, i am sorry if i have not noticed, but the portraits you have been showing of the two of them, louisa catherine and john quincy adams, was there a big age difference between them? >> thank you for asking. but explain how they met and with the age difference was. >> there is an eight year age difference. john quincy was born in 1767, louisa in 1775. they meet in london. if the resident minister in the netherlands. he is sent from there to london to exchange the ratification for the jay treaty. by the times he gets to london, the business is
general control of the government presentation to the supreme court. the petitions to file, what responses to file, oral argument in the solicitor general also decides in the government will appeal an adverse decisions by district court or the court of appeals. the solicitor general has authority to decide when a federal they meet the eye and the supreme court or court of appeals. it's a broad portfolio that requires a large base of knowledge plus the ability to learn fast. the solicitor general does not control with y and doesn't start the process within the justice department feared cases that a writer for out to litigating division civil, criminal and thÉrÈse, and grants a natural resource and environment. then make recommendations, which go to the assistance. sometimes there's an internal conflict. the department of justice include the criminal division and those people always want to defend guards and seized their presence. sublimates divisions tends to favor and somebody has to resolve those on assistant to the solicitor general may think the criminal division statutory. prosecutio
to fund the federal government for the rest of the fiscal year. testifying about the ongoing two year civil war in syria. that live hearing starts at 9:45 eastern. this week marks the 10th anniversary of the start of the iraq war. in 45 minutes we will talk with california representative barbara lee, who opposed u.s. military action in iraq. and a congressman who served as a u.s. air force reserve chaplin, we will get his perspective on the war and veterans' issues. will, a virginia senator join us as part of our spotlight on magazine series. he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and host: good morning, and welcome to the washington journal. the federal reserve chairman holds his news conference with .eporters u.s. aid officials testify on syria. the commerce panel hears from ,he faa about sequestration and a hearing on domestic use of drones. all those events and more on c- span.org. 10 years ago today marks the us- led invasion into iraq. that is where we begin this morning to get your take on the 10th anniversary. here
responsibility for security to the afghan government. chief washington correspondent james rosen joins me live now. james, bring us up to date. >> reporter: good morning. every leader between u.s. leaders and hamid karzai seems to be fraught with tension and this one is no different. aides say secretary kerry's talks will not dwell on the karzai's allegations that the u.s. and taliban are conspiring to weaken the afghan nation. rather they will discuss security concerns as the u.s. and nato mission in afghanistan winds down over the next 29 months and the need for transparency and fairness in the upcoming elections. for the first time in 12 years hamid karzai will not appear on the ballot. over the weekend jon mentioned secretary kerry met with another leader that. iraqi's leader, nouriel malaki. he wants iran to stop using iraqi airspace to deliver foreign fighters to the fighters and the regime in damascus. >> may made it clear members of congress and people in america are increasingly watching what iraq is doing and wondering how it is that a partner in the efforts for democracy and a partn
. >> shepard: this is the fox report. tonight, imagine the government suddenly takes your money from your bank account as a tax. tonight, the plan in one country to do just that and the shock felt around the world. plus, campus shooting plot foiled. tonight, guns, bombs and suicide at one of the biggest universities in america. late night panic and fear on campus. >> the cops had guns and were telling everyone to run. >> shepard: now the suspect is dead. why did he have all the weapons and explosives? tonight, investigators dig into the deadly dorm room drama. and a couple of dare devils do a skyscraper fly by. with nothing more than a pair of wings but first from fox this monday night, police are now saying this could have been a disaster. hundreds of students had the one of the largest universities in our nation evacuated after report of a man with a gun on campus. but there was so much more. when police entered the suspect's dorm room, they found him dead with a pistol and an assault rifle. and a bagful of homemade bombs. and investigators say it now appears to them the suspect was planning
works towards a nuclear weapon. and as we try to determine whether the government of syria has already deployed chemical weapons against its own people. because, in the words of our president, that would be a game changer. >> we have to make sure that we know exactly what happened, what was the nature of the incident, that what can we document? what can we prove. i have instructed my teams to work closely with all of the countries in the region and international organizations and institutions. to find out precisely whether or not this red line was crossed. >> shepard: talk of syria dominated much of the president's news conference in jerusalem this afternoon. he spoke alongside benjamin netanyahu. just a day after both the syrian regime and the syrian rebels accused each other of deploying chemical weapons. now, so far u.s. officials say they have no evidence that those accusations are true on either side. but president obama says he is deeply skeptical that of any claim that the opposition rebels used chemical weapons at all. he did not say the same of the syrian regime. we have team
to cash machines in cyprus this weekend after word spread of the government's unprecedented plan to take money from personal bank accounts. >> it's disgusting. >> reporter: to beat the government to their savings, many waited on long lines before finding themselves empty handed when atms ran out of cash. >> i plan to go to the bank and withdrawal all the money i have in there. i can't trust them anymore. it's theft. >> reporter: to help pay for the $13 billion european bailout, the government plans to take up to 10% from all savings accounts. >> you can't just take out of people's savings, can you? >> let's keep our cash. get it on a bet or something. >> reporter: they say it's sign on and pay up or go belly up. >> we want something that lasts, something durable and that will be sustainable. >> reporter: ahead of tuesday's vote, the president of cyprus held a meeting as a way to soften the blow for residents. >> we fully support the decision of the president of cyprus and their efforts to bring financial stability to cyprus. >> reporter: still, residents say they're furious about paying
how government raises and spends money. >> wow. >> just 19% support the way congressional republicans are dealing with it. and it was nearly split. 47% sided with the president, 46% sided with republicans, and i wonder, joe, if this is at least inspiration enough for them to just get a deal. is anyone going to get worse than this? really? why can't they at least get something done. >>> i think politically the pressure is more on the president for this reason. you go -- you ask somebody -- it's kind of like lawyers. i found that everybody hated lawyers, right? >> yep. everybody loves their own lawyer. you should have seen what she did in court. man, let me give you my lawyer's number. it's the same thing with congressmen. everybody hates congressmen, but hey, my guy, my woman, they go up there and boy they fight. so, again, you've got to put yourself in the position of a congressman looking at 31% approval rating going, yeah, that's fine. i'm saying that 74%, the words of dire straits, you know, i got a daytime job, i'm doing all right. i think the pressure when you look at these numbe
for trying out the new model, government subsidized haircuts shaves and shine will be a thing of the past and you the taxpayer will no longer foot the bill for the grooming of your senators. the american taxpayers have forked over 5.25 million dollars for, yes, senate hair care. pretty unbelievable, or maybe not. because we do know how important the perfect haircut is well, to certain senators. remember john edwards? remember this? ♪ i feel pretty, oh so pretty ♪ ♪ i feel pretty and witty and bright ♪ ♪ >> oh, what a classic. that's all the time we have left this evening. as always, thank you for being with us. let not your heart be troubled, the news continues. greta is next and see you back here tomorrow night. greta, take it away. >> greta: this is a fox news alert. an 8th marine has died after a mortar shell explosion during a training accident in nevada. several marines were also hurt in the desert warfare training and new outrage over senator harry reid's remarks and is he playing politics with the giant tragedy? >> late last night, seven of our marines were killed and ma
that was filled with explosives in his room. bill: washington getting ready for a possible government shutdown about a week from now? will that happen? the obama administration warning lawmakers it might have to cancel the annual easter egg roll on the first of april. that event happens every year. expected to draw ten of thousands to the white house set for april 1st, just a few days after the could run out of money. white house is saying finally by using these tickets guests are acknowledging this is subject to cancellation due to funding uncertainty surrounding the executive office of the president and other federal agencies. if canceled the event will not be scheduled. we'll notify you if there are any modifications of the event. that bass part of the fine print given to members of congress when the invites went out. invites to bob beckel, former campaign manager co-host of "the five." brad blakeman, deputy campaign manager of president george w. bush. good morning to you. who wants to be peter cottontail here? brad, do you want to raise for your hand for that or is that better suted for b
and journalists government officials. they loved it see if you love it when the movie opens in theaters friday. tonight check out splash a new celebrity diving competition show. >> this is scarier than i thought. i never knew i had this much fear of heights until now. it's crazy. >> catch action from "splash" premiers tonight at 8:00 here on abc. last night was the premier of "dancing with the stars". the lowest score went to dl hugly. >> i was never confident. i'm going to do better next week. >> catch a look at week one tonight at 9:00 on abc. for post show interviews go to otrc.com. >> still ahead a somber anniversary. how the bay area is honoring those killed in iraq 10 years since the war started. >> defiant behavior of an 18-year-old in court as he's sentenced for killing three students in >>> president ob yumma about to leave on a trip to the middle east. the white house says the visit will be geared towards winning hearts and minds of the israeli people. it include several symbolic stops. the president set to meet with israeli prime minister and then meet with palestinian's president b
, the hard work of actually governing this church begins. it's the transition from style to substance. that's going to be the story going forward. >> hmm, interesting. all right, let's talk about going forward a little bit as we enter what is the most holy kind of year in the catholic church, the season of easter. outside of the pomp and circumstance, as we head into this time, what happens with what the pope does next? >> well, obviously the preparations now for holy week, he's learning to do what he's been doing as a priest for many years. he was or tained a priest in 1969, so celebrating mass for holy week is not new to him. celebrating it as pope is huge. i'm sure there's a lot of last-minute preparations as all of his assistants who coordinate those things are trying to learn his preferences. and we're seeing a lot of those kinds of things. we talked earlier about the fact that his -- his worth has been rather general and painting with broad brush strokes. so we're right now reading symbols. we're looking at his vesture and the things he's choosing to do. >> what that could mean. >> ho
government has used chemical weapons on its own people near the city of oleppo. listen to this. >> i have a high probability to believe that chemical weapons were used. we need that final verification. we need to step up in the world community to prevent a humanitarian disaster. >> we're tapping into the global resources of cnn this morning to bring you the most complete coverage of the developing story. we have a reporter in jerusalem. ivan watson is in jordan and chris lawrence is live at the pentagon. sarah, how did the developments in syria affect the president's agenda on this trip? >> reporter: well, not much. this has been a major concern already for both the obama administration and netanyahu's administration. we do know according to a senior israeli official that i spoke with on condition of anonymity that this issue of the united states being asked to strike syria if certain things such as some of their weapons, missiles in particular are heading over the border to hezbollah, an organization in lebanon that the united states and israel both consider a terrorist organization. tha
presentation. [applause] >> in 1978, steven hess surveyed 450 journalists covering the federal government for u.s. news organizations. over 30 years later, the author now a senior fellow emarry at that time at the brookings institute visits former subjects to see how things have changed in their careers and journalism in general. this is about an hour. >> senator rubio, i better drink my water first. >> this is very exciting for me, for my wife, because we were friends of karla and david coen. feel we were here at the creation of politics and prose, and the incredible job they did and the idea there would be a second act would be so creative and so exciting under brad and lisa. just means a lot to us. i'm very, very pleased that you would come out on valentine's day. i love you all. in fact i brought pens that are red. i will sign all books with red pens and put in a heart and an xo, hugs and kisses, as well. if you wish them. and the ancient history behind this book has been largely told by brad and his introduction. i did come to brookings in 1972 after being on the white house staff of two p
a bill to avoid a government shutdown to fund agencies through september 30th. senators voted 63-35, in case you're wondering, to limit the debate o legislation. a final vote on the bill could come as early as today. it would be sent to the house for final approval this week. we're going to talk more about the financial issues facing the country with fix the debt. mark burtolini is the ceo and chairman of aetna. >> he said they've -- i think they've done some layoffs. the layoffs were set in place. >> will you combine the white house -- you know, those were shut down with the easter egg hunt. didn't you go on that one year? >> yeah. >> it's starting to dig. it's start to go cut. >> why are people so outraged? >> about the easter egg hunt? >> come on. >> this is one of those things you're not supposed to comment on, right? >> i love easter. >> you really do? >> but you don't have to have it paid for with taxpayer dollars. >> i love the eggs and hiding the eggs. >> it's secular. >> it's in that category. >> you know what it represents. >> it is. >> my birthday is number three, the
of it is is that whether you believe the united states government or members of the united states government were complicit or actually were active in 9/11, the truth was there is no debate at all that they used it for a false pretense to enter the iraq war and to exercise the military action in the middle east on a skill that they never had the right to do or the justification to do. the interesting thing is it's like people get so caught up in the conspiracy aspect of 9/11 itself that they forget there was an actual, beyond debate mechanic of conspiracy to use 9/11 as a precursor to go into iraq when they knew they had nothing to do with 9/11, there was no ties from al-qaeda to sadaam hussein or iraq. they were not there. they had not been there. as a matter of fact, it was quite the opposite. it was one of the areas because of his secular rule that they did not have ground. the presence of al-qaeda was not going to happen. that was actually one of the groups he would have used chemical weapons against. how do you like that? that's amazing. thanks for the call alan. i think we have time for one more call
into the employ of cost-cutting hospitals, gives government the authority to determine services that will and will not be covered, has a board independent of congress that can cut payments for care and allows the secretary of health and human services to force all health plans to eliminate any doctor that doesn't practice medicine the government's way. the history of government-run health care systems around the world is a history of denial, delay and sadly, even death. anderson, i notice that she responded not long after the democratic campaign committee which is in charge of getting rid of republicans, of defeating them in elections, put out a press release blasting her, saying she would rather be in washington as a right wing celebrity than solving problems back in minnesota for minnesota's middle class. remember, she got a scare back in november. her election, her congressional election was closer than she expected and democrats are hoping to beat her this time. >> we certainly appreciate the response. it doesn't seem to back up the claim, though, that this health care will
economists say the number is inflated since government agencies may choose to reduce worker hours rather than lay them off. layoffs and furlough notices are going out to workers affecting defense to nuclear waste cleanups to parks and recreation. we bring back marc lamont hill and will cain. you say the budget cuts are designed to make the president look bad. the white house is trying to mitigate the effects of the forced cuts. americans don't seem to have reacted to the cuts overall. >> many americans aren't feeling it on the ground and secondly many americans are just tired, overwhelmed with the narratives of fiscal doom from debt ceilings to fiscal cliffs. we keep hearing the sky is falling. >> what it about trying to make the president look bad. you think republicans like this is hanging out there and they think if there's no apocalypse it will make the president look bad? >> i think they miscalculated, they thought the american people would respond a little more aggressively against the sequester than they actually had. i think that was part of the idea, they don't want to kick the can d
in washington, it is a big job on capitol hill with the senate expected to approve a plan to keep the government running, and we're getting word funding for some critical programs hit hard by automatic spending cuts might also be restored. chief congressional correspondent mike emanuel live on capitol hill with that. seems like the biggest fight is not the short-term funding, but the broader budget debate, huh. >> >> reporter: the so-called continuing revolution to avoid a government shutdown seems to be on the path toward passage. overall, everybody seems to be feeling pretty good about it. so rather than going on the senate floor and singing "kumbaya", senate majority leader harry reid took time a few minutes ago to blast the house republican, paul ryan, budget plan. >> hand out more budget-busting tax breaks for the wealthy, and to pay for these wasteful tax breaks, ld -- it would end medicare guarantee, it would raise tax on middle class families. to appease the tea party, the ryan republican budget would risk recovery, and that's just a price too high. >> reporter: needless to say, republic
of the disasters of iraq was the dissolution of the state. so when bashar al assad goes, and the government believes ultimately he will, those institutions, those governing bodies will be necessary for the day after. for those people who are left holding the bag, what has become basically a sectarian war, to put back a government. it is a critical lesson and a police take we cannot ever make again. >> as we look back and relitigate the war in iraq, i think it is easy to say on its face, it was a clear mistake and we'll never do this again, how could we do this. let's not forget that. a lot of democrats voted for this war. including hillary clinton. that's what i want to ask you about it. she voted for the iraq war resolution in 2002. 2007, refused to see that vote as a police take. she has defended that since. i'm wondering if you think that is going to be a political problem for her. in 2016 if she ends up running. >> let me say a couple things. having been in the white house i realize how hard it is to govern and to make these national security decisions. it is not black and white and it
of the israel government and yet unflinching support for their security can go hand in hand. no it's true. yes. [ gasping ] >> hal: and the president showed that in israel yesterday. we have had an either/or policy. we have had presidents who side completely with israel you know, and just unflinchingly any jerk, go with whatever the president does and ignore -- >> the no daylight strategy. >> hal: yeah, if they start building settlements, it's like well, i can't really -- and acting as if that's not hamstringing the peace process throughout. but at the same time, you know -- and then you have other presidents who are like i'm not a fan of how we're doing things so we'll drift back and let it -- you know, let our standing boilerplate, we always stand with israel, and no outreach to the people no expression into the process, and that's -- that's been our back and forth. >> uh-huh. >> hal: i have -- i can't recall a president doing basically what the israeli palestinian conflict is, since carter i suppose, the way clinton did it with the -- with the ira, british idea. this can
about destabilizing jordan and giving us maybe an advantage in iran if the syrian government changes and the fallout with israel. i think the long-term issue is do we have values that want to prevent this kind of thing? after all, europe finally did it and we were with them in bosnia. we didn't do it in rwanda. we did act in libya which has less strategic interest for us than this. i think there is no choice any more. i was very cautious for a long time and applauded obama for being cautious, but now we have reached the tipping point. >> we will come back to this. we have a lot of other news to cover as well. >>> first leg of mark sanford's shot at political redemption is complete. he easily clenched a spot in the runoff for the charleston area congressional seat. what is still unclear who his opponent will be. following thin voter turnout, bostic and grooms separated less than 1%. now sanford will try to cobble together support for those who voted for other candidates in what was a packed field flanked by his sons, sanford invoked the importance of putting the country's financial ho
that if -- if -- if our small businessman has to pay more money to the government, then he's going to have less money to pay to his ememployers, and the ememployers will have less money to send kids to the school of their choice. i think it's a matter of talking about the debt differently. not just we are in imminent danger in a debt crisis in this country. but what does that mean to people? it means that our government is growing so fast and it's becoming so expensive that we're making payments to our credit cards that we can't afford, which means we have to keep -- we'll keep having this debate about needing more revenue to the government. well, that means less money in people's pockets. it means less money at home. less money to put in your car. we have to tell the history of our party. the history of freedom and opportunity and equality. which we're not doing. and in your report earlier -- i think -- go ahead. sorry. >> yeah, listening to sarah palin, the republican vice presidential nominee in 2008, what she said at cpac this weekend. >> the next election is 20 months away. now is the time to fu
have this whole debate about internal improvements and what the role of the federal government should be and all of that. this is a country poised for an economic take off. monroe prosides over it. dan, as you work your way academically through the monroe papers, how much documentary evidence is there about elizabeth monroe? >> unfortunately there is not a lot. based on what her daughter reported was that at some point after he left the presidency monroe burned all personal correspondence. there is one letter that survives that is written by elizabeth. there is one letter from james to her that survives. what baffles me and drives me nuts is there is only one let they're she wrote to somebody else. she had an extensive correspondence with her friends and sisters and these letters aren't anywhere. beyond why not. seems like somebody would have kept some of these. subsequently there is a lot we don't have. there are letters that mon crow wrote to her sons-in-laws that talk about family matters. congressmen wrote letters home talking about meeting ms monroe. other women in washington rec
cordial greetings to the head of states and government. to the official delegations of many countries of the world and the diplomatic corps. in the gospel we heard that joseph did as the angel of the lord commanded him and took mary as his wife. in these words, we already have the mission that god entrusts to joseph. that of being the custos, the protector. protector of whom? of mary and jesus. but it's a protection that extends to the church, as blessed john paul ii underlined. just as st. joseph took loving care of mary, and gladly dedicated himself to jesus christ's upbringing, he likewise watches over and protects christ's mystical body, the church, of which the virgin mary is the exemplar and model. how does joseph exercise this protection? this role as protector? with discretion, discreetly, humbly, in silence, but with a constant presence and a total fidelity, even when he doesn't understand. from the matrimony with mary, to the episode of jesus when he was 12 years old in the temple of jerusalem, he accompanies, tenderly in every moment. he's next to mary, his spouse in serene
of the federal government should be and all that. this is a country poised for economic take off. much like a light eisenhower presided -- >> as you work your way, how much evidence is there about elizabeth monroe? >> there is not a lot. based upon what her elder daughter reported, at some point after he left the presidency, monroe burned all personal correspondence. there is one letter that survives that is written by elisabeth. there is one letter from james to her that survived. what baffles me and drives me nuts is there is only one letter she wrote to somebody else. she had extensive correspondence with her sister and friends and these letters do not seem to be anywhere. i do not understand why not. it seems like somebody would have kept some of these. consequently, having firsthand evidence of what she thought about things, we do not have. there are letters monroe wrote to his daughters, to his two sons and laws, to his political advisers, that talk about family matters. he wrote letters home talking about meeting mrs. monroe, other women in washington recorded in their diaries. there
is defending the pope that he cooperated in the military government in the 1970's argentina government. the president there has been out spoken critic of same sex marriage and free contraceptio contraception. human rights activist caused the pope of turning blind eye of former military rejaime but the vatican call the charges slanderous. the pope will be installed in less than 2 hours. we will carry the installation ceremony live beginning at 1 12:50 in the morning. also have leif streaming coverage of the mass that follows at abc 7 news.com. at 1:30 am. >> coming up here next exploratorium concert cut shor short. >> she was serious. people in the audience were screaming. stop it please people started walking out. >> san francisco night club pulls the plug on a sinker for the first time in its history. what she said that stirred so so many people up got them to get up and leave. >> are you kidding me? you have no clue what you are doing. >> fireworks outside of court following lindsay lohan sentencing. why her dad was so fewer with us an attorney. >> and the world tiniest medical
that accompanies him here, the dirty war, terrible civil conflict between a conservative government and leftist rebellion in the 1970s. many thousands of people disappeared, killed. the role of many people in the catholic church questioned, challenged on both sides. and cokie, i just want to go to you on this. this is something that has been brought up by critics of then cardinal bergoglio, now pope francis, that he did not do enough. some even say that he might have been complicit. >> he was actually superior, the provincial of the judgments at the time of the dirty war. and there was one particular accusation about two jesuits who were working with the poor. they were what we called at the time liberation theologians, and then father bergoglio had his disagreement was that theology. but, and the accusation is that he with drew his protection from them and they were then tortured and almost killed by the regime. in the days since he has been named pope, we have seen a lot of reporting on this. and what appears to be the case was that he was not a collaborator in any way with the military regim
by the government grinch? the easter bunny, a victim of sequestration? well, nothing is definitely yet, but guests have been warned. politico go this explanation from a white house official. "because we distribute tickets to the easter egg roll far in advance, we alerted all ticket holders that this event is subject to cancelation, due to funding uncertainty, including the possibility of a government shutdown. however, we are currently proceeding as planned with the easter egg roll." republicans are doubtful. newt gingrich shared his outrage on twitter. shaleless! how else can you describe the threat to cancel white house easter egg hunt? maybe ma lettic, demagoguic. you try to fin the right words." we'll try to describe it at the bottom hour. >>> voters in south carolina heading to the polls for today's primary to choose the next house representative. one of those candidates just happens to be stephen colbert's sister, her name is elizabeth colbert bush. yes, she pronounces her name differently. in a rare interview, we see the serious side of stephen colbert. he sat down with jake tapper, host of
. has sad's regime, they're blaming the rebelses, they're blaming the government. so who has the access to the chemical weapons? who has the most to gain from this? >> reporter: first off there is no definite proof that chemical weapons were used. what we do know is in an area near allepo, both the regime and reb bem belels are saying some gas was given off and we've seen pictures taken from a hospital showing some soldiers and civilians obviously suffering from the effects of gas. this appears to have landed very close to rebel regime lines, but actually hit the regime more hard. as you said earlier, the rebels don't really have the chemical weapons and if they did, that would suggest the assad stockpile has fallen into their hands. the regime is saying the rebels did have it, but the assad regime are the ones with the large chemical stockpile. once again no definitive proof they were used at all, but a serious development. >> one that the president had spoken about hypothetically back in august when he used the words red line. here he was in august. >> we have been very clear to the a
, deutsche bank and u-b-s are being sued. this is the first government backed lawsuit of the libor scandal. meanwhile, fannie mae says its "weighing the possibility of a lawsuit." in france-- police searched the home of imf chief christine lagarde. investigators poked around lagarde's paris apartment for clues about her role in compensation paid to a french business man reports say lagarde is accused of giving him preferential treatment in deal/ she denies any wrongdoing. solar panel company suntech has declared bankruptcy. after defaulting on a large payment to bondholders, banks have pushed the company into bankruptcy court. a glut of competition in the solar panel industry hurt prices, and contributed to the companies' collapse. its stock currently trades near 59 cents. among stocks sensitive to what's going on with the economy... fed ex shares hit a road block with investors-- falling-- more than 7 dollars yesterday.. after the company revealing profits fell 30% last quarter wtih weakness in asia. the company also pulled back on its full year forecast. shares of caterillar lost mor
. >> the syrian government blames terrorist groups for the alleged chemical attack. it triggered new calls on capitol hill to arm opposition forces, something sharply divided members of congress. lawmakers are debating the potential that weapons provided by the u.s. could fall into the wrong hands. john boehner says congress should be consulted before the administration carries out any potential military action. boehner says that did not happen before the u.s. became involved in libya. >>> now to an issue of gun reform where republicans have seen their bill stripped down in the face of tough opposition. "the new york times" reports dianne feinstein stormed from harry reid's office monday when she was informed that her ban would not be included in the bill. the measure never had a chance citing lobbying and the nra and concerns from both parties doubt about the impact on stopping gun violence and lack of support from the gun safety groups like that of former congresswoman gabrielle giffords. instead of imposing new regulations, republicans are calling for existing laws to be enforced. >> do
the government funded through september. a looming shutdown set for next week. the plan passed 318-109 in the house. a budget deal can be the long way off. as both parties hash out spending cuts. paul ryan's plan which made major slashes to entitlement programs in an effort to balance the budget within a decade passed the house. but as expected, died in the senate. >>> one of the key parts of the ryan budget includes the repeal of the president's health care law. tomorrow marks three years since the legislation was signed into law. according to michelle bachmann, failing to do away with it will have dead lly consequences. >> the american people, especially vulnerable women, vulnerable children, vulnerable senior citizens now get to pay more and they get less. that's why we're here. because we're saying let's repeal this failure before it literally kills women, kills children, kills senior citizens. let's not do that. let's love people. let's care about people. let's repeal it now while we can. >> standing room only. put a couple seat fillers behind those people when they speak. >>>
government saying iraq should not allow iran to fly african-americans and spiders to the war there. the secretary pushing iraq leaders to end sectarian violence. steve is joining us live from washington with more on this story. >> reporter: the central issue here is whether iraq's president the prime minister, that is, a she'ite muslim is helping to support the assad regime in syria. now, secretary kerry met with iraqi president nouri al-maliki during a visit in baghdad today. those iranian flights were at the top of the agenda. they had what kerry described as a spirited discussion. here is the secretary. >> anything that supports president assad is problematic and you i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are in fact helping to sustain president assad and his regime. >> reporter: the u.s. believes the iranian aircraft flying over iraq are carrying weapons to arm the syrian government but tehran says they are delivering only humanitarian aid there. they wanted to force the planes for inspections but only a few have been checked. >> i think the i
ignored and demanding a government investigation. we have a special "outfront" investigation. >>> plus, amanda knox, is she going back to jail? italy supreme court tonight considering whether she should go to trial again. >>> and the echos of a tsunami. what washed ashore from the other side of the planet from a tsunami years ago today? it's monday. a brand new start. your chance to rise and shine. with centurylink as your trusted technology partner, you can do just that. with our visionary cloud infrastructure, global broadband network and custom communications solutions, your business is more reliable - secure - agile. and with responsive, dedicated support, we help you shine every day of the week. ♪ i don't wanna be right [ record scratch ] what?! it's not bad for you. it just tastes that way. [ female announcer ] honey nut cheerios cereal -- heart-healthy, whole grain oats. you can't go wrong loving it. bob will retire when he's 153, which would be fine if bob were a vampire. but he's not. ♪ he's an architect with two kids and a mortgage. luckily, he found someone who gave him
of a major conflict. hawthorne is run by an independent contractor under a deal with the government. >> state with abc7 news for continuing coverage of this deadly explosion at the hawthorne army depot in nevada. we will bring you any new information as it becomes available. we will have the latest developments on abc7news.com. >> we have sprinkles now, but the better weather is on way. here is our meteorologist, mike nicco, with live doppler 7 hd. >> it has been quiet this morning. live doppler 7 hd shows picking up the first signs of more wet weather headed toward the north bay, especially further to the north you can see along mendocino county and crescent city moving from west to east right now. this will extend down toward us and fill in so scattered sprinkles are possible in the afternoon. we need the rain. we are nearly 4" in the deficit to 6.5" in a deficit. periods of light rain in the north bay tonight. most of us get our rain tomorrow morning. kristen? cheryl? >> thank you very much. in san francisco, the bart station at powell street is opened against after bart service was stoppe
below the poverty line. >>> to medical news. a government survey of parents shows one in 50 school children in the u.s. has autism. that is significantly higher than a previous estimate. and there is also a significant new clue about autism. abc's dr. richard besser explains more. >> reporter: now another clue into a possible cause of autism, grandfathers age. researchers in sweden have found that the older a grandfather was when he had children, the more likely those children would be to have children with autism. for fathers the risk went up 1.8 times. for mothers the risk went up 1.7 times. it is already known that one piece of the puzzle of autism is the age of the father, starting at age 30. take ray civo. >> let's figure out if there is a genetic factor. >> reporter: his sons oscar and hugo both have autism with different struggles from reading to social interactions. moms pass on few dna mutations. but dads pass on an average of 25 new mutations at age 20. increasing to 65 mutations at age 40 and so on. the more dna mutations, the greater the risk of autism. what does this h
a gov. -- government issue. >> there are certain things that should not be put up for a vote and gay people and like nongay people deserve to build a life and have dreams of having a family. >> reporter: outlawing same-sex marriage or domier defines marriage as between a man and woman. he believes in traditional marriage but not the same sex marriages. the majority supports same sex marriages but some say it is more important to read the constitution. >> i am against a ban on same- sex marriages because they are simply unconstitutional. >> christina ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and the berkeley couple plan on getting married this june. christian perry have been together 13 years and have raised four boys. it has been hurry up and wait. the other place of in the proposition case. >> we need you to stay right here for our continuing coverage and stevenson is on our way and he will be at the supreme court for tuesday's oral arguments. then on tuesday join us for a special report and that's happening at 6:30 on the proposition 8 case and we will gauge re
government and 84 information gone to, 0 gone to the federal governme government. >> alisyn: and then new jersey has a high state tax as you can see, 10.8%, so 36 1/2 million will go to new jersey, i know you're thinking, can i move today to texas? and i know you shall the winner are listening and kudos for your ingenuity. yes, you might be able to move to a state with no state tax, but new jersey might still take it. >> jesse: and if chris christie has its way, going to get more of your dough because i think the 7.8 to 9.8, good luck. >> clayton: hallelujah. still taking home 216 million dollars. that's what he would get it end. >> jesse: what would you do with that kind of dough. >> alisyn: let's talk about that. >> clayton: i don't know. >> jesse: would you buy me a boat. >> clayton: i would buy you a boat first. i don't know helping starving children i would help jesse get a boat. >> jesse: a charity chase. >> clayton: help my parents out if they wanted to do like a bathroom repair they've been looking at. >> alisyn: the bathroom repair. >> clayton: and go, buy a couple of dvd's. >> j
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